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Rucker & Rucker
Jason Rucker

405 N. Washington St., Suite 101
Falls Church VA 22046
(703) 536-0022

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Rucker & Rucker

Please Call : 703-536-0022


Rucker & Rucker has been a well-established law practice with over 70 years of continuous operation. Unlike other law firms, Rucker & Rucker is a family practice founded in Arlington County by the late Denman T. Rucker in the 1930s. Today his son and grandson continue the family tradition of outstanding client service and resourceful trial advocacy on behalf of their clients throughout Northern Virginia. Our firm's reputation for sound legal advice and professional integrity has grown through three generations. Our familiarity with the local courts, in particular, the courts in Arlington County and the City of Falls Church, can represent an important advantage for anyone who needs to resolve or dispute a legal problem. Although most of our clientele have legal issues pending in Arlington County or the City of Falls Church, we also represent clients in Fairfax County, Loudoun County, Prince William County, and the City of Alexandria.

If you need legal advice in criminal defense, have a traffic infraction, planning or going through a divorce, or have a personal injury claim, contact an experienced trial attorney at our office.

Experience Matters

At Rucker & Rucker our legal reputation in Arlington County and the City of Falls Church represents an advantage. We pride ourselves on preparing your case for trial and presenting your position to a judge or jury. However, we understand what is at stake for clients facing a pending criminal charge or civil accusation. We understand that our clients have an interest in protecting other important interests: keeping your job, protecting a professional license, repairing a damaged reputation, and, at times, avoiding a public trial.

If you have a legal question or need legal representation, contact us today.

About Us

Denman A. Rucker
Rucker & Rucker

Managing Partner
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email: http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/denman/feedback.html

Denman A. Rucker has been in private practice with an emphasis in Arlington County and the City of Falls Church since 1974. He is primarily involved in litigation with an emphasis on criminal defense, domestic relations, and personal injury. He has served as trial counsel in five death penalty cases. He is appointed by the Circuit Court of Arlington County to serve as Commissioner in Chancery and Judge Pro Tempore. Denman A. Rucker received his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from George Washington University in 1970 and graduated from American University's Washington College of Law in 1974. He is admitted to practice in the state of Virginia. Denman A. Rucker is a member of the Virginia State Bar, Arlington County Bar Association, Virginia College of Criminal Defense Attorneys, and has served on the Board of Directors for the Arlington County Bar Association since 1990.

Areas of Practice:

Criminal Defense
Personal Injury
Domestic Relations/Divorce/Child Custody and Support

Bar Admissions:

Virginia, 1974
U.S. District Court Eastern District of Virginia, 1976
U.S. District Court Western District of Virginia, 1976

Education:

American University, Washington College of Law, Washington, District of Columbia, 1974 J.D.

George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, 1970 B.A.

Professional Associations and Memberships:

Virginia State Bar
Fairfax County Bar Association
Virginia College of Criminal Defense
Arlington County Bar Association, Board of Directors since 1990.

_____________________________

Jason S. Rucker
Rucker & Rucker

Associate
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email:
http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/jason/feedback.html

Jason S. Rucker has been in practice with Rucker & Rucker since 2001. He is primarily involved in litigation with an emphasis on criminal defense, domestic relations and personal injury. While pursuing his education in Jackson, Mississippi, he was a law clerk and became an associate with a law office practicing in the area of civil litigation. Jason S. Rucker also established a private practice in Mississippi before returning to Virginia. Jason S. Rucker received his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from West Virginia University in 1994 and graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law in 1998. He is currently admitted to practice in the state of Virginia and before the Federal Court for the Eastern and Western District of Virginia. Jason S. Rucker is a member of the Virginia State Bar, Arlington County Bar Association, and the Fairfax County Bar Association.

Areas of Practice:

Criminal Defense
Personal Injury
Domestic Relations/Divorce/Child Custody and Support

Bar Admissions:

Virginia, 1999
U.S. District Court Eastern District of Virginia, 2003
U.S. District Court Western District of Virginia, 2003

Education:

Mississippi College School of Law, Jackson, Mississippi, 1998 J.D.

West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 1994
B.A.
Major:  Political Science

Professional Associations and Memberships:

Virginia State Bar
Fairfax County Bar Association
Arlington County Bar Association

______________________________

Ana Cruz
Rucker & Rucker

Legal Assistant
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email: http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/ana/feedback.html


Ana is our legal assistant who joined Rucker & Rucker in January 2007. Ana was born and raised in Northern Virginia. Ana is fluent in Spanish.

Please Call : 703-536-0022

About Us

About Us

Denman A. Rucker
Rucker & Rucker

Managing Partner
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email: http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/denman/feedback.html

Denman A. Rucker has been in private practice with an emphasis in Arlington County and the City of Falls Church since 1974. He is primarily involved in litigation with an emphasis on criminal defense, domestic relations, and personal injury. He has served as trial counsel in five death penalty cases. He is appointed by the Circuit Court of Arlington County to serve as Commissioner in Chancery and Judge Pro Tempore. Denman A. Rucker received his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from George Washington University in 1970 and graduated from American University's Washington College of Law in 1974. He is admitted to practice in the state of Virginia. Denman A. Rucker is a member of the Virginia State Bar, Arlington County Bar Association, Virginia College of Criminal Defense Attorneys, and has served on the Board of Directors for the Arlington County Bar Association since 1990.

Areas of Practice:

Criminal Defense
Personal Injury
Domestic Relations/Divorce/Child Custody and Support

Bar Admissions:

Virginia, 1974
U.S. District Court Eastern District of Virginia, 1976
U.S. District Court Western District of Virginia, 1976

Education:

American University, Washington College of Law, Washington, District of Columbia, 1974 J.D.

George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, 1970 B.A.

Professional Associations and Memberships:

Virginia State Bar
Fairfax County Bar Association
Virginia College of Criminal Defense
Arlington County Bar Association, Board of Directors since 1990.

_____________________________

Jason S. Rucker
Rucker & Rucker

Associate
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email:
http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/jason/feedback.html

Jason S. Rucker has been in practice with Rucker & Rucker since 2001. He is primarily involved in litigation with an emphasis on criminal defense, domestic relations and personal injury. While pursuing his education in Jackson, Mississippi, he was a law clerk and became an associate with a law office practicing in the area of civil litigation. Jason S. Rucker also established a private practice in Mississippi before returning to Virginia. Jason S. Rucker received his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from West Virginia University in 1994 and graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law in 1998. He is currently admitted to practice in the state of Virginia and before the Federal Court for the Eastern and Western District of Virginia. Jason S. Rucker is a member of the Virginia State Bar, Arlington County Bar Association, and the Fairfax County Bar Association.

Areas of Practice:

Criminal Defense
Personal Injury
Domestic Relations/Divorce/Child Custody and Support

Bar Admissions:

Virginia, 1999
U.S. District Court Eastern District of Virginia, 2003
U.S. District Court Western District of Virginia, 2003

Education:

Mississippi College School of Law, Jackson, Mississippi, 1998 J.D.

West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 1994
B.A.
Major:  Political Science

Professional Associations and Memberships:

Virginia State Bar
Fairfax County Bar Association
Arlington County Bar Association

______________________________

Ana Cruz
Rucker & Rucker

Legal Assistant
phone: (703) 536-0022
fax: (703) 536-0025
email: http://www.ruckerlawoffice.com/ana/feedback.html


Ana is our legal assistant who joined Rucker & Rucker in January 2007. Ana was born and raised in Northern Virginia. Ana is fluent in Spanish.

Our Founder

Denman T. Rucker, Esq.
1911-1987

The following is an excerpt from the book, Bar Nostalgia, Memories and Reflections of the Arlington Legal Community, from the 1950's to the Present, (see photo below) written by the late Ken McFarlane Smith. The book includes a collection of columns from the Journal of the Arlington County Bar Association that were written by Ken McFarlane Smith. One such column was written about our Founder, Denman T. Rucker. It is being reproduced with the permission of the Arlington County Bar Foundation which published the book. The excerpt is taken from pages 103-108 and reads as follows:

Bar Nostalgia

 

Denman Rucker: 'The Good Guy' from Bar Nostalgia, pages 103-108

 

Although I have revealed a rascal or two in the history of the Arlington Bar Association, generally I have only written about the good guys (so no one can take offense, "good guys" refers to all genders of any nature whatsoever). There was one super good guy I haven't mentioned other than in passing. He was Denman Rucker, father of the lawyer of the same name who still practices in Arlington today.

Denman Rucker was a handsome, stocky, white-haired, and very pleasant man who somewhat resembled senior circuit court Judge Walter T. McCarthy. Denny was always a player in the Bar Skit, for two reasons: (1) He played the part of our senior Circuit Court judge with style, copying his mannerisms and pronunciations skillfully, and (2) he had a beautiful tenor voice and could really sing. He was always the showstopper when he played the part of "Falter T. Malarkey." Ernie Gearheart, a partner in the firm Jesse, Phillips, Klinge & Kendrick, and I sang with Denman in the Clarendon Baptist Church Men's Choir. Ernie and I were never asked to solo-Denman was asked frequently.

I have had to reconstruct (because I was not in Arlington yet), but when commonwealth's attorney Lawrence Douglas resigned, his assistant Denny Rucker was appointed by the Circuit Court for the remainder of his term. Then in 1948, Denman ran for and won a four-year term as commonwealth's attorney. I don't know the details, but sometime during that term there was a big scandal concerning certain county officials playing poker with local builders and developers. Denman was involved. Interestingly enough, he was the one who (because of his own conscience) blew the whistle. He knew full well it might harm his career, and it did. There were no criminal charges or indictments, but in 1952 Bill Hassan, a sort of newcomer and outsider, ran against Denman in the Democratic primary. Bill didn't make a big deal out of the scandal, but it was there, a haunting omnipresence, and Denman lost his bid for reelection in a close vote. The circuit judges then appointed Denman as a commissioner in chancery to hear divorce cases. For years, he did the lion's share of those cases.

From the beginning, I liked him very much personally, but soon got a real reading on his characrer. Millie and I were members of the First Baptist Church of Clarendon. One Sunday in 1955, he asked to talk with me after church. He told me he was considering a run for commonwealth's attorney and wanted my support as a very active and involved Young Democrat. He stared that he would commit to me that if I supported him and he won, he would appoint me as his assistant. I revealed to him that I had been asked the same thing by Bill Hassan but that as of that time, I had not committed. I also told him Bill had likewise promised me the next available vacancy. However, I told him I would "like to think it over."

Without missing a beat,Denny put his arm around my shoulder and said, "Don't pass up that opportunity. Hassan is the incumbent and I have not definitely decided to run. You would only be getting a possibility from me in exchange for what could be a sure thing from Bill Hassan." A lesser man might have shaded the truth a little or argued in order to get support. But not Denman! He was too principled for that. Denman's final decision was not to run. I had committed to Bill Hassan, and in 1956 was appointed as an assistant, just as Bill had promised. I have never forgotten Denman's honesty. He was far above deceiving a young lawyer or even running the risk of trying to confuse him politically. In spite of the minor scrape he had gotten into concerning gambling, for these and other reasons his integrity was (in the opinion of practically everyone) beyond question.

Denman served for many years as a commissioner in chancery. The balance of this column will be devoted to a couple of humorous incidents during hearings before him, one known to me and one told to me.

In those days, divorce was not really an easy matter. There was a lot of "behind the back" hand-shaking, along with sly winks concerning the presentation of facts necessary to justify granting a divorce. There was no such thing as a no-fault decree. Therefore, any times even lawyers of stature managed to exaggerate the facts enough to obtain a divorce, when those unadorned facts, left to the ordinary measure of proof, might have failed. Denman could always sort these things out and make sure that the record justified the decree. The Circuit Court judges had great confidence in his ability. He could always separare the wheat from the chaff and make sure that justice prevailed.

In one of my earlier cases before Denman, I represented a young lady who, accompanied by her sisrer, had told me in my office several times before we actually appeared for testimony that her husband, an Air Force sergeant, had beaten her on many occasions. I was consumed with righteous indignation when I appeared before Denny to present the evidence. Imagine my surprise, when, with my client on the stand, I asked her about abusive and violent behavior and got the answer, "Well, he wasn't so bad!" This was surprising to me, but I thought maybe Denman would excuse her, feeling that she was only attempting to ease her own feelings, not realizing that she might be undermining her case. I decided that her case would improve if backed by her sister's testimony, since the sister had eagerly corroborated everything my client had said to me earlier.

When the sister took the stand after preliminary questioning, she suddenly, in response to my question, said, "As a matter of fact, I did not see an awful lot of them because during the three months they lived with me, they spent practically all of their time in the bedroom." I went into total shock. I recalled that upon arrival they had glanced suspiciously at the court reporter. I had neglected to mention that their testimony would be under oath. I assumed they knew that. This apparently set them off, and they became very reluctant to say anything similar to what they had told me in my office. Denman looked at me with an amused smile on his face and asked me if I wanted a recess. I told him that a continuance would be more in order, and he readily agreed. We therefore continued the matter and left.

Once I got them back in my office, I told them in no uncertain terms that the testimony they had presented before the commissioner, if left standing, would never make it, and if they did not testify to the facts as they had laid them out to me on several occasions in my office, there would be no divorce granted. I advised them to think it over and call me.

Within a week or so my client called me and told me that they were ready to testify as to exacty what they had said in my office and that I should reschedule the hearing. I got a date and took them before the commissioner, and they testified right down the line-exactly what they had told me in my office. After all the evidence was in and they had left the room, Denman looked up with a whimsical smile on his face. He asked, "When were they telling the truth?" I looked at him straight in the eye and said, "Denny, I don't have the faintest idea." He roared with laughter and slapped the desk, but he recommended that the divorce be granted. It was granted. For my own peace of mind, I decided years ago that the truth was the "office" version.

Paul Varoutsos related another funny incident at a hearing before Denny. I was not there, but you can get Paul's version at your earliest opportunity. Paul had a case in which a young lady and her best girlfriend were going to testify about the dastardly (not a misspelling) deeds of her husband and then get a divorce. On the big day, Paul said he appeared at Commissioner Rucker's office in order to meet his client. He was surprised to find that not only the client, but her best friend, were dressed in most revealing miniskirts. They also were wearing low-cut blouses which allowed much cleavage to show. In short, Paul said he felt like he was going to church in the company of a couple of scantily clad showgirls. That is not actually the way he put it, but you get the idea! Don't be misled-they apparently were worth the view.

In the law at that time, there was an absolute requirement that sometime during a divorce hearing you had to ask the question of a woman, "During your marriage, were you a true and dutiful wife to your husband?" Paul got to that part of the case without incident. When he asked the big question, his client looked at her friend sitting on the couch and the friend giggled. With that, his client then burst into giggles, and Paul said that he, as well as the commissioner and the court reporter all had the same intuitive flash at the same time. This gal could have been dutiful, as asked, but "true"? Never! Paul said whether she was married two weeks, two months, two years, or two decades, it was highly improbable that she would have been "true" and that both she and her girlfriend knew it-hence the giggles.

Commissioner Rucker started laughing, the court reporter started laughing, and Paul, going along with the occasion, decided it was really worth a laugh. Finally, pandemonium governed the scene, and Denman put his head down on the desk on his arms and shook uncontrollably with laughter. After a period of time, when everybody got all their laughter out and calmed down, Denman looked at the court reporter and said in a solemn voice, "Please record the witness's answer as 'Yes."' This again was an index to Denman Rucker. He certainly saw the humor in the situation, but he realized instantly that there would be no justice gained by allowing that question to rule on the matter of her divorce. Being a true Virginia gentlemen, he recorded an answer that solved the requirement but also did it justice. It all turned out for the best not only for Paul, but for his client, because she got her divorce. Who knows? Even her husband may have been greatly relieved by the granting of the divorce!

Through all his years, Denman was active in the Bar Association and a credit to our profession. In later years, when his son came to practice with him, he resumed greater interest in our Bar Association. His death had a considerable impact on the then-younger members of the Bar, who knew him since he was so active in his later professional years. There were many kind and considerate attorneys practicing in Arlington at that time, but Denman Rucker was one of the kindest and most considerate. He was a first-class role model for many young lawyers of that time, a thing sorely needed in today's world.

Contact

Rucker & Rucker

Contact one of our lawyers for help with criminal defense, divorce or personal injury.

Call us at 703-536-0022, or e-mail us through the form on this page.

Rucker & Rucker,
Attorneys at Law
405 N. Washington Street
Suite 101
Falls Church, VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-0022
Fax: 703-536-0025


Arlington County / Falls Church VA Criminal Defense Attorney

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