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Roger Priest, Attorney at Law LLC
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Roger Priest, Attorney at Law LLC
Roger Priest

1832 NE Broadway St #200
Portland OR 97232
(503) 901-1036

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Fax: (503) 766-4291


Roger Priest, Attorney at Law LLC

Please Call : (503) 901-1036


Criminal Defense

Expe­ri­enced Port­land DUI and Crim­i­nal Defense Attorney

Roger Priest is a Port­land, Ore­gon lawyer who rep­re­sents clients accused of crim­i­nal wrong­do­ing for a vari­ety of mis­de­meanor and felony charges, includ­ing DUI, drug offenses, domes­tic vio­lence, and theft-related crimes.  If you want to leave noth­ing to chance and insure you get an expe­ri­enced lawyer to help with your defense, then call Attor­ney Roger Priest today to sched­ule a free no-obligations con­sul­ta­tion.  As a for­mer pros­e­cu­tor, Roger Priest has the trial expe­ri­ence and knowl­edge nec­es­sary to pro­vide you with a strong defense.

Roger Priest has worked hun­dreds of DUIs, dozens of drug charges, and tried more cases to a jury than most lawyers.  Roger Priest can eval­u­ate the strength of the State’s case against you, insure that inad­mis­si­ble evi­dence is thrown out of court, pre­pare an effec­tive defense, and choose the right jury for your case.

If you need help defend­ing against any of the fol­low­ing crimes or pro­ceed­ings, call Roger Priest today for help:

Know Your Rights When Deal­ing With the Police

Most peo­ple do not under­stand their rights when deal­ing with the police. The police are intim­i­dat­ing and are trained to take advan­tage of that stress to gain your coop­er­a­tion and sub­mis­sion to their author­ity. How­ever, the United States Con­sti­tu­tion gives you power over the police that you should under­stand and not be afraid to use to your advan­tage.

If the police inves­ti­gate you for a crime, you can­not get into trou­ble for remem­ber­ing and tak­ing advan­tage of these rights. Your free­dom may depend on it.

  • You Do Not Have To Answer Police Ques­tions. Every­one is famil­iar with the phrase “you have the right to remain silent,” but very few peo­ple take advan­tage of it. Many peo­ple evenly fool­ishly believe they can talk their way out of trou­ble. Remem­ber that the police talk to peo­ple in your posi­tion dozens of times a day, are trained to keep ask­ing you ques­tions and push­ing you for answers, and they often record every­thing you say to be used against you in court. Given that fact, it is never a bad idea to err on the side of cau­tion and decide to say noth­ing rather than some­thing stu­pid or incrim­i­nat­ing. By sim­ply telling the police you don’t want to talk to them, they must, by law, stop ask­ing you ques­tions. If they do not stop, your answers and other evi­dence obtained because of it can later be thrown out of court. Fur­ther­more, they can­not use your unwill­ing­ness to talk to them as evi­dence against you.
  • You Do Not Have to Give the Police Per­mis­sion to Search You, Your Vehi­cle, or Your House. Again, the police are trained to ask for your per­mis­sion to search, because it is much eas­ier than get­ting a war­rant. How­ever, they may be ask­ing for per­mis­sion because they have no other legal basis to con­duct the search. There­fore, you don’t have to give them per­mis­sion and you can’t get in trou­ble for refus­ing to give them per­mis­sion. You have pri­vacy rights under the con­sti­tu­tion which the police must respect. If they don’t, any evi­dence they find might be thrown out of court.
  • You Have the Right to Have an Attor­ney Present When You Are Ques­tioned by the Police. If you do want to answer police ques­tions, the police don’t get to choose the place, time, and cir­cum­stances. You have the right to talk to an attor­ney first and have that attor­ney present with you to help you out. An attor­ney can act as a valu­able resource of advice (and even a wit­ness on your behalf) if the police try to step on your con­sti­tu­tional rights.
  • You Have the Right to Know Whether You Are Under Arrest or Free to Leave. When deal­ing with the police, you are either detained or free to leave. There­fore, if you don’t want to talk to the police any­more, you are free to ask them, “am I free to leave?” They must then decide whether to arrest you or not. If they lack prob­a­ble cause to arrest you, they must let you go. If they are try­ing to build a crim­i­nal case against you, you don’t have to help them build it. There­fore, remem­ber you are always free to leave unless you are under arrest or detained.
  • You Don’t Have to Believe What the Police Tell You. Lastly, the police are trained to use pow­ers of per­sua­sion to gain your con­fi­dence and com­pli­ance. While they can­not out­right lie to you, they can “promise” you all types of things on which they can’t deliver in order to get you talk­ing. This may include a promise to “talk to the judge,” “see what he can do to help you out,” or even “promise to not charge you with a crime.” The police ulti­mately do not decide whether charges are filed, so they are using your naivety against you. If you remem­ber that the police are try­ing to incrim­i­nate you and not make friends with you, you will be bet­ter served.

Svi­denko v. DMV (A146173) Case Summary

Please Call : (503) 901-1036


My Promise to You, My Future Client

If you hire me, Roger Priest, to han­dle your Bank­ruptcy, DUI, Per­sonal Injury or Divorce needs, you will always work and speak directly with me regard­ing your case. I will never push you off onto a para­le­gal or staff per­son, because I seek to pro­vide supe­rior client ser­vice and atten­tion. Call me directly at (503) 901-1036 to sched­ule a FREE con­sul­ta­tion today because I offer afford­able flat-fee options on many case types.


If you need an attor­ney for Bank­ruptcy, Divorce, or DUI and want afford­able, atten­tive ser­vice, look no fur­ther. If you want the best, you need an attor­ney who will give your case the most time and atten­tion. I keep a small and man­age­able case­load so I can devote the max­i­mum atten­tion to each client. Ulti­mately, earn­ing your trust and respect is more impor­tant to me than sim­ply earn­ing your money.


I am a Port­land attor­ney and for­mer Ore­gon pros­e­cu­tor with count­less hours of trial expe­ri­ence who will put your legal needs above all else because I under­stand that my clients’ hap­pi­ness is cru­cial to my own suc­cess. Life doesn’t keep bank­ing hours so nei­ther do I.  If you need a Port­land attor­ney, I am avail­able on evenings and week­ends and can meet you in my North­east Port­land office or travel to you.


Roger Priest, Attor­ney at Law LLC
1832 NE Broad­way St #200
Port­land, OR 97232
(503) 901-1036

 

I am a Port­land bank­ruptcy attor­ney who helps clients in Port­land and through­out Ore­gon obtain debt-relief through both chap­ter 7 and chap­ter 13 bank­ruptcy.  If you are fac­ing unman­age­able credit card, med­ical, or tax debt call me to dis­cuss whether bank­ruptcy can help you.  If you are fac­ing a poten­tial fore­clo­sure, are upside down in your mort­gage, or are fac­ing a poten­tial gar­nish­ment of your wages or bank accounts, then bank­ruptcy might be in your best inter­est.  I will help you review your finances, teach you about the bank­ruptcy laws, and help you decide whether bank­ruptcy would ben­e­fit you all dur­ing a no-obligation free attor­ney consultation.

Port­land DUI Attorney

As a Port­land DUI attor­ney, I have han­dled hun­dreds of DUI cases.  If you have been arrested or charged with a DUI or other crim­i­nal charges in Port­land or through­out Ore­gon, call me for help.  I can offer you a free con­sul­ta­tion in Port­land or by phone and help you develop a strat­egy to best defend against your charges.  Don’t take chances when your lib­erty is on the line.  Call today.

Port­land Divorce Lawyer

Divorce and child cus­tody dis­putes are never pretty, but they don’t have to get ugly.  I am a Port­land divorce attor­ney who will take the time to teach you about Ore­gon divorce and child cus­tody laws and help you make a smart deci­sion about your family’s future.  Some attor­neys would rather prey on your igno­rance and emo­tions in order to run up their attor­ney fees.  Just because you are vul­ner­a­ble dur­ing a divorce doesn’t mean you should hire a Port­land divorce attor­ney who will take advan­tage of you.  I am not that kind of divorce attor­ney and will try to nego­ti­ate and coop­er­ate where pos­si­ble in a divorce. But if nego­ti­a­tions break down, I have the court­room expe­ri­ence to get results in trial.

Port­land Per­sonal Injury Attorney

Few peo­ple plan for being seri­ously injured, but when mis­for­tune hap­pens, you need a Port­land per­sonal injury attor­ney who knows how to prop­erly build your case to max­i­mize your recov­ery.  Money is no sub­sti­tute for your good health, but a good Port­land per­sonal injury attor­ney can make sure you have the money nec­es­sary to pay all your med­ical bills, pay for your time off of work, and com­pen­sate you for your pain and suf­fer­ing.  I will work tire­lessly on your per­sonal injury case to insure that you get a fair recov­ery.

Please Call : (503) 901-1036


Criminal Defense

Expe­ri­enced Port­land DUI and Crim­i­nal Defense Attorney

Roger Priest is a Port­land, Ore­gon lawyer who rep­re­sents clients accused of crim­i­nal wrong­do­ing for a vari­ety of mis­de­meanor and felony charges, includ­ing DUI, drug offenses, domes­tic vio­lence, and theft-related crimes.  If you want to leave noth­ing to chance and insure you get an expe­ri­enced lawyer to help with your defense, then call Attor­ney Roger Priest today to sched­ule a free no-obligations con­sul­ta­tion.  As a for­mer pros­e­cu­tor, Roger Priest has the trial expe­ri­ence and knowl­edge nec­es­sary to pro­vide you with a strong defense.

Roger Priest has worked hun­dreds of DUIs, dozens of drug charges, and tried more cases to a jury than most lawyers.  Roger Priest can eval­u­ate the strength of the State’s case against you, insure that inad­mis­si­ble evi­dence is thrown out of court, pre­pare an effec­tive defense, and choose the right jury for your case.

If you need help defend­ing against any of the fol­low­ing crimes or pro­ceed­ings, call Roger Priest today for help:

Know Your Rights When Deal­ing With the Police

Most peo­ple do not under­stand their rights when deal­ing with the police. The police are intim­i­dat­ing and are trained to take advan­tage of that stress to gain your coop­er­a­tion and sub­mis­sion to their author­ity. How­ever, the United States Con­sti­tu­tion gives you power over the police that you should under­stand and not be afraid to use to your advan­tage.

If the police inves­ti­gate you for a crime, you can­not get into trou­ble for remem­ber­ing and tak­ing advan­tage of these rights. Your free­dom may depend on it.

  • You Do Not Have To Answer Police Ques­tions. Every­one is famil­iar with the phrase “you have the right to remain silent,” but very few peo­ple take advan­tage of it. Many peo­ple evenly fool­ishly believe they can talk their way out of trou­ble. Remem­ber that the police talk to peo­ple in your posi­tion dozens of times a day, are trained to keep ask­ing you ques­tions and push­ing you for answers, and they often record every­thing you say to be used against you in court. Given that fact, it is never a bad idea to err on the side of cau­tion and decide to say noth­ing rather than some­thing stu­pid or incrim­i­nat­ing. By sim­ply telling the police you don’t want to talk to them, they must, by law, stop ask­ing you ques­tions. If they do not stop, your answers and other evi­dence obtained because of it can later be thrown out of court. Fur­ther­more, they can­not use your unwill­ing­ness to talk to them as evi­dence against you.
  • You Do Not Have to Give the Police Per­mis­sion to Search You, Your Vehi­cle, or Your House. Again, the police are trained to ask for your per­mis­sion to search, because it is much eas­ier than get­ting a war­rant. How­ever, they may be ask­ing for per­mis­sion because they have no other legal basis to con­duct the search. There­fore, you don’t have to give them per­mis­sion and you can’t get in trou­ble for refus­ing to give them per­mis­sion. You have pri­vacy rights under the con­sti­tu­tion which the police must respect. If they don’t, any evi­dence they find might be thrown out of court.
  • You Have the Right to Have an Attor­ney Present When You Are Ques­tioned by the Police. If you do want to answer police ques­tions, the police don’t get to choose the place, time, and cir­cum­stances. You have the right to talk to an attor­ney first and have that attor­ney present with you to help you out. An attor­ney can act as a valu­able resource of advice (and even a wit­ness on your behalf) if the police try to step on your con­sti­tu­tional rights.
  • You Have the Right to Know Whether You Are Under Arrest or Free to Leave. When deal­ing with the police, you are either detained or free to leave. There­fore, if you don’t want to talk to the police any­more, you are free to ask them, “am I free to leave?” They must then decide whether to arrest you or not. If they lack prob­a­ble cause to arrest you, they must let you go. If they are try­ing to build a crim­i­nal case against you, you don’t have to help them build it. There­fore, remem­ber you are always free to leave unless you are under arrest or detained.
  • You Don’t Have to Believe What the Police Tell You. Lastly, the police are trained to use pow­ers of per­sua­sion to gain your con­fi­dence and com­pli­ance. While they can­not out­right lie to you, they can “promise” you all types of things on which they can’t deliver in order to get you talk­ing. This may include a promise to “talk to the judge,” “see what he can do to help you out,” or even “promise to not charge you with a crime.” The police ulti­mately do not decide whether charges are filed, so they are using your naivety against you. If you remem­ber that the police are try­ing to incrim­i­nate you and not make friends with you, you will be bet­ter served.

Svi­denko v. DMV (A146173) Case Summary


Portland, Oregon Criminal, Bankruptcy, and Injury Attorney

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